Edward T. Vaughan

   

Thank You!

I would like to thank everyone who downloaded a copy of my book. So far about 25,000 this year alone. All I ever wanted was to share my book. I hope that you all will find it an entertaining and enjoyable read.

Faded Lives Reaches Bestseller Status on Amazon

Faded Lives peaked at # 43 in Literature & Fiction > Women's Fiction > Domestic Life  on Amazon Kindle and

on the Amazon Best Sellers Rank: it peaked at # 1,901 Paid in Kindle store out of about one million ebooks.

Faded Lives Featured on Indie Spotlight 1/4/2012

I just received word that the website had selected my book to be featured on the website today. Please check it out at the link below.

http://www.theindiespotlight.com/?p=8626

Twelve Poems ebook reaches #1 on Amazon Kindle Bestseller List for 20th Century Poetry.

I released an ebook of poetry I wrote between 1990 and 1992 on amazon.com in December. I was pleased to see it climb to the # 1 spot for 20th century poetry and # 15 overall for the Poetry category.  I put it on www.smashwords.com for free as I can't see charging for it. I just thought others might enjoy it.

Southern festival of Books 10/14/11 to 10/16/11

The author participated at this year's festival as part of a display with the Nashville Writers Meetup Group. The 2011 Southern Festival of Books was held from October 14 to October 16 on War Memorial Plaza in downtown Nashville. The festival featured readings, panels, and book signings.

Interview with Bill Thompson at The Bookcast.com

Does He Really Want to Know The Family Secrets?

October 11, 2011
What do you know about your ancestors? You know what they look like, if you have photo albums. Perhaps they left some letters, maybe an old newspaper clipping. But what does that really tell you about them?

Imagine learning the truth about your family. I mean, the real truth, the parts no one talks about anymore, the details no newspaper clipping contains.

In his novel “Faded Lives” Edward T. Vaughan introduces us to one young man, Mark Stephens, who’s about to find out about his ancestors. And what he finds out is going to change everything.

To hear the interview visit the website at the following link:

http://www.thebookcast.com/fiction/does-he-really-want-to-know-the-family-secrets/

TCM Book Review 

 

August 19, 2011

Pictures can be deceptive. We look at the happy smiling faces of our ancestors in old yellowed photographs, but don’t necessarily know the truth of that captured moment. We are embraced by the love of our extended family members, but may not understand the pain that they endured in their lifetime, long before we existed.

Faded Lives tells the story of one family. While mark is helping his grandmother Emily organize her house after the death of Mark’s beloved grandfather, she shares memories of the past: great joys and special moments, but also secrets and hidden things. Always interested in genealogy, suddenly the family history becomes so much more than names and dates. Mark gains a depth and understanding. I think in the process, his connection and respect for his grandmother deepens.

Faded Lives is the journey that each of us could take. Having lost my grandmother last year, I wish that I could have sat with her and listened to her stories. Perhaps, I could have understood her better.

By Tami Brady

http://www.tcm-ca.com/?p=9142

Whispering Winds Book Review

by Sandra S Heptinstall

What I first loved about this book was the cover. Then when I read the book and discovered the importance of the picture, no other picture could have given the story justice.

Mark Stephens has felt guilty every since he was not able to make it in time to see his grandpa before he died. So when time passed he jumped at the chance to help his grandma when she called. It was one week he would never forget. While he feasted on all the good country food his grandmother made; he also learned about his grandma and the history of her family.

Every day as he helped his grandma get things in order, she would share with him what had gone on in her family growing up. It is those stories that make this book good. It is more than just an interesting read, as you will find you can’t wait until grandma Emily talks again.

It is the ending that I found so beautiful and peaceful. I can’t tell you why, but that is my perception. I found it hard to believe this is a first time author.

by Sandra Heptinstall

http://whisperingwindsbookreviews.blogspot.com/

Celtic Frog Book Review

Faded Lives is a novel by Edward T. Vaughan. He tells the story of Mark who visits his grandmother sometime after the passing of his grandfather. Mark is feeling guilty that he didn’t make to his grandfather’s death bed in time to say goodbye, and he is determined that he will have time with his grandmother while she is still healthy.

His grandmother Emily has her own reasons for wanting her only grandson to visit. She wants to tell the true story of her family. Her story is filled with much more drama than Mark had ever dreamt. Yet Emily is like Scheherazade who tells the story of the Arabian Nights. Emily tells the tale in snippets as the house is being tidied

Edward weaves the work of clearing up the house and Mark’s grandfather’s things with the story of his grandmother’s family and its secrets. The relationship between Mark and his grandmother is revealed and deepened as the story develops and he learns things that will change the way he thinks of his family, his grandmother and himself.

The writing of this story is relaxed and welcoming. I found the characters of Mark and his grandmother especially engaging. The story of the past is well conceived and is skillfully woven into the tapestry. One part of the novel I really liked was the food. The meals during the week are almost a character in themselves as we are treated to a breadth of home cooking that is sadly all too rare these days.

I found reading Faded Lives very satisfying. As in most good stories there is a lesson to be learned, but Edward doesn’t try to hammer the point home. I finished the book with a smile on my face. I have no difficulty recommending this book.

 by Alex McGilvery

http://www.celticfrogreviews.com/